Predicate Noun

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What is a Predicate Noun?

The predicate noun or predicate nominative—as it’s also known—is a nounOpens in new window that completes or complement a linking verbOpens in new window and renames the subject of the verbOpens in new window.

The predicate noun completes the predicateOpens in new window but refers to the subject and usually means the same person or thing as the subject.

How Predicate Nouns Can Function

A predicate noun typically follows the linking verb and answers the question who? or what?

It also stands for the same person or thing as the subject.

For Example:
    • James became the class captain.

    Here, “James became what?” —Answer: he became the class captain.

    • The president of United State is Joe Biden.

    “The president of United State is who?”—, Joe Biden.

In example 1) the class captain is the same person as James (subject).

Likewise in 2) Joe Biden is the same person as the president (subject).

Other Examples of Predicate Nouns
  • My grandfather was a news-reporter.
  • The gangster turned snitch.
  • It is she (predicate pronoun)
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